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ECO-CONSCIOUS ENTERTAINING TIPS FOR EARTH DAY

Entertaining that is eco and socio-conscious as well as healthy  does not have to consist of brown invitations, brown napkins, brown bags, brown rice, and brown breads. It is possible to have a party which is green and glamorous–as well as multi-colored! And to be aware of what you are buying, using, doing and its impact on the environment and on others.

INVITATIONS AND DECORATIONS

Here are some wonderful ideas for your eco-conscious party.  Electronic invites are not only easy, but very environmentally friendly Arranged centerpieces of fresh or dried fruit or vegetables (edible), as well as flowerpots and small trees (reusable), make wonderful spring and summer decorations. Send these gifts home with guests or deliver to a hospital or nursing home Create entirely edible centerpieces, using (takeout) chopsticks skewered with fruits, vegetables, meats, and cheeses Use decorative cloth napkins–or bandanas. Tie them with bamboo, hemp, or raffia Large leaves can become place cards when written on with non-toxic ink Collect wine corks to use as place card holders; slit and insert paint chips or cardboard with guest’s name.

FOOD AND DRINK

Look for foods which are organic (regulated by USDA), biodynamic (sustainable, self-contained system, where everything on the farm is re-used or recycled), and/or sustainable (sustains rather than degrades the environment, and is economically viable).  If at all possible, THINK and BUY LOCALLY. Saves transportation costs, supports local economy, stays fresh longer, and tastes better. Local organic eggs and artisanal cheeses are widely available throughout the year For drinking, serve filtered ice water in pitchers rather than bottles; use organic teas and fair trade coffees; purchase local (if possible), organic wines and liquors. 50 states now produce their own wines. Look for beverages in recyclable glass bottles.  Prepare the meal around one main dish, which incorporates various fresh vegetables and/or fruits, such as gazpacho with various toppings. Prevent waste by purchasing and preparing food in appropriate quantities. Offer at least one dish for vegetarians, which is free of animal fats/products. Barbecue with grass-fed beef and sustainable seafood for better taste as well as greener event.

PARTY FAVORS

For a final eco-chic touch, send guests home with seed packets, bulbs, small potted plants or their own bandanas, soybean or beeswax candles. Homemade cookies, jams, small breads, vinegars, and pickles all lend a nice homey touch.

FUN IDEAS AND TIPS

Combine your party with a Spring Clean-up event for your neighborhood, local park, school or playground, nearby empty or parking lots, or with an exchange or tag sale to help your guests with their spring house and garage cleaning Organize a salt or honey tasting ,which also educates guests about the various ecological and taste choices available For a really special event, purchase and release butterflies indigenous to your area and beneficial to the environment Live music will save electricity, and using your iPod will provide music without lots of gear.  Use beeswax or soy candles and organic soaps in powder room/guest bathroom  Have your event during daylight hours to conserve power For green chic, try recycled cardboard made into everything from vases and bowls to tables and room dividers. Objects made by Liquid cardboard(tm) are 100% recycled and recyclable–even the glue is vegetable.

DON’T FORGET THAT EARTH DAY 2019  is Monday, April 22!


FOR THE IDES OF MARCH: CAESAR SALAD

DEFINITION

A classic Caesar Salad is made of romaine lettuce dressed with olive oil and lemon juice, egg (raw or lightly coddled), Worcestershire sauce, black pepper, parmesan cheese. This mixture is tossed in a wooden bowl, then sprinkled with croutons, adding texture.

PROVENANCE

The Caesar Salad is generally believed to have been invented in Tijuana, Mexico, on July 4,1924 by Cesar Cardine, an Italian immigrant and restaurateur. Originally, the leaves were arranged on a plate so that they could be eaten as finger food.

Greatly enjoyed by Mrs. Wallis Warfield Simpson (later the Duchess of Windsor), she helped to popularize it both in the United States and Europe. Julia Child , also a Caesar Salad enthusiast, has said she was served by Cesar Cardine himself when she was a child.

In 1956, three years before Cardine’s death, the master chefs of the International Society of Epicures in Paris proclaimed the Caesar Salad to be “The greatest recipe to originate from the Americas in 50 years”!

In the late 70’s Caesar Salad was discovered by the fast-food industry, resulting in an amazing increase in the production of romaine lettuce–from almost no production in the 70’s,  to the cultivation of more than 16,000 acres in the 90’s, to today’s growing of over 80,000 acres.  With his sister Rosa, Cardine produced Cardine’s Original Famous Caesar Dressing which is still available today.

HOW TO SELECT MAIN INGREDIENTS

  • Romaine Lettuce (sometimes called Cos Lettuce because it came from the Aegean Island of Cos)–Look for boldly colored, firm heads, heavy for their size and with tightly closed leaves. Select heads that have been cut close to the leaf stems. Avoid heads that are wilted and leaves that have brown edges, rust, or holes. Large white milky ribs and some leaf tips on outer leaves can be quite bitter.
  • Eggs–Purchasing eggs from cage-free, organically-certified and organically-fed chickens will help to assure quality and freshness while significantly reducing any potential of salmonella poisoning.
  • Croutons–For authenticity, prepare croutons from a loaf of rustic Italian bread.

HOW TO STORE MAIN INGREDIENTS

  • Romaine Lettuce–Rinse and dry the lettuce, place in plastic or special “greens” bag for refrigeration up to one week.
  • Eggs–Store eggs in coldest part of the refrigerator and never leave unrefrigerated for more than 2 hours. Throw out any eggs which have an odor or any cracks or breaks.
  • Croutons–Croutons will last about 1 week if stored in an airtight container on shelf or in refrigerator; up to 6 months if stored in a freezer in an airtight container or heavy-duty freezer bag. If croutons contain butter, store in refrigerator or freezer to avoid rancidity.

HOW TO USE

  • As an appetizer course, a salad course, an entree for lunch or dinner
  • Dressing sometimes includes pounded anchovies or anchovy garnish, garlic, Dijon mustard, blue cheese, and/or capers.
  • Salad variations include grilled chicken, bacon, meat, shellfish or fish.
  • Buon appetito!   Cin-cin!

WHOLISTIC  CONCERNS

  • Although the primary Caesar Salad ingredients are very healthful, questions remain about the safety of eating raw eggs. The major concern is contracting salmonellosis (from the salmonella bacteria), which can result from the improper preparation, handling, or refrigeration of infected eggs. It is uncommon and, in healthy people, it is usually a benign, self-limiting illness.
  • Raw eggs should not be used in any food prepared for pregnant women, young children, or those whose health/immune systems are compromised.

TIPS

  • There is a special tossing technique used at tableside which requires the tosser to skillfully break 2 eggs onto the romaine, then gently roll over and round the leaves.

WACKY FACTS

July 4 is National Caesar Salad  Day.

The Ides of each month was a standard way of saying the 15th of the month And the Ides of March was originally an especially  festive day, celebrating the God Mars. On this day In 44 B.C. Julius Caesar was stabbed (23 times) to death, after having been forewarned by a seer on his way to the Senate. Subsequently The Ides of March has become a symbol of foreboding, as immortalized in Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar–“Beware, the Ides of March.”

According to the Guinness Records, in October 2007, Tijuana Mexico broke the world’s record for the largest  Caesar Salad, weighing  in at over 2 tons!

“Bewitched”  had an episode about Samantha’s  attempting to make a Caesar Salad and having to call on Julius Caesar for help.

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SPRING FLINGING

Yes, it’s just a string and a spool! –A spherical spool attached to one’s finger with a cord that is looped around the grooved middle of the spool. When run up and down the cord with skillful throws and jerks, the spool takes positions and does tricks.

It’s been around since ancient Egypt and was played with by Greek youths in 500 B.C. There are reports that Napoleon and his army played with yo-yos just before the Battle of Waterloo. The yo-yo was very popular in the Philippines, and it was a Filipino American, Pedro Flores, who made the yo-yo popular in the United States and the rest of the world in the 1920’s. He sold his company to D.F. Duncan, Sr. who trade-marked the name “yo-yo” and set up his factory making wooden yo-yos in Luck, Wisconsin, which then became the “Yo-yo Capital of the World”.

Contemporary yo-yo culture, however, now includes innovative techniques, sophisticated technologies, large online communities, yo-yo collecting, and international competitions for individuals and teams. Most competitions consist of two parts—compulsory tricks and freestyle. Yo-yo enthusiasts are making efforts to include yo-yoing as an Olympic sport.

Major technological innovations since the 60’s include the automatic return and the ball-bearing yo-yo. Other innovations include the transaxles, free-spinning plastic sleeves, friction pads and O-rings, wide variety of shapes, and materials improvement. A number of yo-yo accessories are available as “after-market” modifications—players buy items, such as ceramic bearings, friction stickers, brake pads, or weight rings, separately from the yo-yo to augment performance over the original model shipped from the factory.

Today’s yo-yo manufacturers feature new materials from titanium to exotic woods; unique names such as Oxygene and Syzgy; and limited editions like “Ride the Void”. Recent innovations include an aluminum body, the auto-return clutch system, and a brake pad response system. China has become the top selling yo-yo market.

How to Select a Yo-Yo:

  • There is no single best yo-yo. Certain shapes and models are better suited to various tricks and to different styles of play, as well as different skill levels.

General Guidelines: Skill Level

  • For Beginner—Select standard fixed axle with a take-apart design (so one can more easily untangle knots) and an auto-return mechanism.
  • For Intermediate—Select transaxle yo-yo, as longer spin times make learning tricks easier.
  • For Advanced—Select ball-bearing yo-yo.

General Guidelines: By Style of Play/Tricks

  • Imperial or Standard—Best for looping, as having weight towards the center gives increased stability in the air.
  • Butterfly—Best for string tricks, as the wide gap makes it easier to catch the yo-yo on the string.
  • Modified—Good for both looping and string tricks, as the weight around the rims creates the extra circular inertia that causes the yo-yo to sleep long.
  • Off-string—this yo-yo requires two hands, as the string is not attached to the yo-yo. The Chinese Diablo is a giant version of this type.

Use:

  • Adjust string according to your height.
  • Find the correct string tension for each trick.
  • Basic yo-yo techniques include sleeping, looping, freehand, and off-string.

Care and Maintenance:

  • Do not overtighten a take-apart yo-yo.
  • New strings are safer and perform better. Replace string when it looks dirty, shows signs of wear, or feels stiff or hard.
  • Help maintain wooden axles by placing a small amount of wax on the last few inches of the axle end of the string.
  • Placing a couple of drops of light oil on a bearing yo-yo will help it to sleep and return better.

Wacky Facts:

  • The yo-yo is said to be the first toy to fly in outer space. In 1985 NASA sent a basic spinning yo-yo on the Space Shuttle Discover to see what effect microgravity would have on it. In 1992 the yo-yo again made its way into space on the Space Shuttle Atlantis.
  • The highest priced yo-yo, signed by Richard Nixon(!) and presented to country music singer and fiddler Roy Acuff at The Grand Ole Opry in 1974, was auctioned off for $16,029.00.
  • In 1968, activist Abbie Hoffman was cited for contempt of Congress for “walking the dog” (a yo-yo trick) during a session of the House Subcommittee on Un-American Activities
  • Many yo-yo enthusiasts also enjoy sporting yo-yo shaped objects, such as cell phones, salt and pepper shakers, clocks, and cocktail shakers.

Podcast: Cracking the Code on Elite Etiquette – Jennings Wire

Please enjoy this podcast interview with Dawn Bryan and Annie Jennings of Jennings Wire on proper etiquette.

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Highlights from the conversation include:

  • How would you define “etiquette” for the 21st Century? What is Elite Etiquette?
  • What are some of the unspoken, unwritten rules, customs and traditions? When do they apply?
  • What if you make an embarrassing protocol mistake in your business communications?
  • In new experiences, what do most people worry about doing wrong?
  • Why do some businesses ask to have a MEAL with a job candidate before making an offer?
  • What does the gift you give say about you? How is it a reflection of who you are as a person?
  • Why is it important in this rapidly changing, social media world to learn about etiquette and protocol?

Listen to the full podcast HERE

Full article HERE


International Business Protocol

By Dawn Bryan, best-selling author of “The Art and Etiquette of Gift Giving” and “Elite Etiquette”, and founder of Qualipedia ™

It is very easy to unwittingly offend your international business prospects. Many global marketing efforts and contract negotiations have been destroyed by the unintentional blunder.

Being too late or too early for an appointment, using the wrong form of address, improperly receiving a  business card, shaking hands, bringing wine to a home dinner, insulting with your choice of business gift, using a “hard sell”,  or even eating everything on your plate could ruin your negotiation…and reputation. Americans most often make mistakes with meeting/greeting rituals; eating/dining; giving/receiving;   and not recognizing significant taboos. And, when setting up or responding to a meeting request, remember that many Europeans and South Americans write the day first, then the month, then the year when using numbers.

Meeting/Greeting Rituals
Although handshakes are standard greeting gestures among Europeans, the gesture is generally more formal and more firm—except for the lighter touch of the French. Usually those of higher rank and women are expected to extend their hand first. Asians will often greet you with a gentle handshake; however, the bow is more traditional and more respected. Learning how to bow, including depth, eye contact, etc. is very important. Some South Americans can be effusive and take a long time to greet, believing that this conveys respect for the other person.  In many cultures, it is good manners to shake hands with everyone in a group/room upon arrival as well as departure.  Many European and South American women kiss each other on alternating cheeks. In Brazil, a third kiss between women bestows “good luck” in finding a spouse!

Be sure to use the proper form of address when meeting—or greeting: there are many different customs. For example, Europeans rarely use first names until they know the person well; unlike the United States, titles, especially academic titles, are always used.  Asian names are usually listed in a different order from Western names. In Japan, use last names plus San meaning “Ms.” or “Mr.” The Chinese are very sensitive regarding status and always use official titles, such as “Committee Member”. Titles are also important in some Central/South American countries: in Panama the title Licenciado is used for anyone with a bachelor’s degree. In Norway, lawyers and clergymen do not use titles, although government officials do.

Learn the business card protocol for each culture. Your card should have the other person’s language printed on the back and that side should be presented to her/him. The presentation itself is important, particularly in Asian cultures where it is given with a proper bow. Do not just quickly stuff someone’s card into your pocket or bag. Always treat another’s card with respect, taking the time to read and appreciate it. When you meet with several people, be sure to give your card to each person lest you slight someone.

Eating/Dining
Whether you are a host or a guest, you should be familiar with the local food, drink, punctuality expectations (local time), when and how to conduct business, and appropriate seating. In some cultures, guests are expected to arrive late—don’t be offended at your Spanish associate’s late arrival. In others (Japan, The Netherlands, Sweden), tardiness is considered very rude. In Italy, the more important the person, the later he/she may arrive to a business meeting. Europeans are generally not fond of business breakfasts.

Learn when and how to correctly order and eat difficult or new foods. If possible, practice eating in the style of the other person—European, American, chopsticks.

Giving/Receiving
In some countries, such as Norway, gift-giving is simply not a part of doing business, whereas in many other cultures (Japan) it is an integral part of the process of learning about the other person. In China a banquet is an acceptable business gift.

Some business gifts are not presented until negotiations have been completed (Latin America), others at the beginning (Korea).Some countries (Australia) have very strict quarantine laws regarding even wood products and many foods.

To avoid looking cheap, do not give logo gifts unless they are of excellent quality and the logo is subtle.

If bringing flowers to someone’s home, be certain that the color, number, or actual type of flower is not offensive: in many countries certain flowers and colors signify death.

Taboos
Do not be impatient when dealing with cultures such as Saudi and Russia. Russians prize patience as a virtue and some regard compromise as a sign of weakness.

It is usually inappropriate for a foreign business woman to invite her male counterpart to a business dinner unless other associates or spouses attend.

Do not dress casually for a business meeting, and, if a woman, probably best to wear a skirt.

Never say “no” to the Japanese and understand their aversion to the word. (This maintains harmony and saves face.)

Arab World – Do not give or present anything with your left hand; give an alcoholic beverage or bar gift; or show the sole of your shoe.

 


Dawn Bryan Featured on Big Blend Radio Talking About Elite Etiquette

Listen to Dawn on Big Blend Radio discussing her new book Elite Etiquette.

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TOP TIPS TO HOST A MEMORABLE HOLIDAY PARTY THIS YEAR

 

-Lifestyle Expert and Best-Selling Author Dawn Bryan Offers Ten Tips for Those Hosting Friends and Family This Holiday Season-

NEW YORK, NY, November 13,2016- Whether the Holiday is Thanksgiving, Chanukah, Christmas Eve, Kwanza, or the New Year, these occasions are meant to be shared with an abundance of good food and drink, good conversation, and good cheer.  And the thoughtful host will know how to provide a welcoming atmosphere of warmth and conviviality.

Dawn Bryan, author of the best selling “The Art and Etiquette of Gift Giving,” Celebrity protocol and etiquette expert and founder of Qualipedia, a consumer information and lifestyle website, offers the following tips will help you to put that personal signature on your own entertaining :

1. Plan with Personal Style: Plan a party that you would enjoy attending yourself and once it starts make sure to be a guest at your own party!

2. Don’t Over Extend Yourself: Make sure you do not over-stretch, over-reach, or under-estimate the time and resources required, especially at holiday time when both are at a minimum. Make lists and notes, which will compel you to be realistic about your time and money.

3. Be Creative: If you don’t have the space or facilities to prepare and serve an entire meal, be creative with a dessert party, an after-the-caroling reception, or a honey, salt or wine tasting.  Then make it your signature annual event!

4. A Versatile Menu: If you have little help with serving, select a versatile menu that can be served either hot or cold, minimizing your need to run back and forth to the kitchen.

5. You Don’t Need to be a Great Cook to Give a Great Party.  Choose your menu from take-out foods, platters or casseroles from local restaurants, prepared food from your grocery store, food specialty store, deli, catalog or on-line. Or combine packaged and prepared foods with fresh fruits or vegetables. Your finishing touches will make it your creation, for example, placing the food into hollowed-out breads or vegetables; arranging onto antique serving platters or trays; setting the bowl in middle of a holiday wreath; garnishing dishes with foliage from your yard.

6. Organize Food and Drink Stations: Place food and drink (except maybe for nuts and nibbles) in separate locations. This helps with “crowd control” and diminishes the likelihood of spilling drinks and dropping plates.

7. Expecting Children? Prepare for them with their own play and eating area, activities, and easy-to-eat foods and contained drinks.

8. Greet Your Guests: Your or another family member should make every effort to make guests feel welcome as soon as they arrive. For a guest to find no one at the door, then have to figure out where to put coats and boots, then finally wander into the kitchen to discover that the host’s head is in the oven  is not very welcoming.

9. Don’t Micro-Manage. Relax. After guests arrive, allow things to flow. But do be sure that arrivals who may not know your other guests are properly introduced. Prior to their arrival, you can ask a friend to “look out” for them.

10. Select Music: to complement, not dominate, the party. It should be compatible with your guests” tastes, non-repetitious, and should be louder at the beginning of the party when there are fewer guests and you want people to converse, than later on when people may be forced to raise their voices to be heard in conversation.

Dawn’s bonus tip is to always send guests home with a small goody bag: Christmas stocking, bagels or donuts for breakfast, a magazine, a holiday poem, a 2012 calendar, small bags of your special fudge or macaroons, a tree ornament.